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cannot say it is not constitutional, i cannot afford it. michael melina a fascinating case. he is a glass cutter from redding, mass., working as grandparents firm. they only had a few employees, and typically, they will have somebody that works outside of the small business provide the coverage. if your husband is employed by a corporation, you would get the health insurance for the corporation. the small glass cutting firm did not provide health insurance. michael went to the state and said he had been on the health insurance connector, which was this new agency formed for people like him. if you do not get insurance through your company, you do not qualify for government programs. you could go on to the connector, which is like a shopping mall for various insurance programs. he said i have a wife that is out of work, a mortgage, condominium fees, a car payment -- he detailed his expenses, and he said he cannot afford the six ended $28 for my monthly health- insurance -- $620 for my monthly health-insurance premium. if the state said we think you can, and you should buy this program or t
of nato special operations headquarters. let's hear now from michael in stat on lay in a on the republican line. >> caller: thank you for listening. >> host: yes, go ahead, michael. >> caller: it is astonishing to me why we don't put the support behind turkey since turkey supported us. i cannot understand why we don't go in, full guns, and support of ally. that is all i have to say. >> guest: well, michael. we actually have -- the united states has strong support for turkey since clinton and their foreign minister in turkey consulted earlier this week in refons the shelling that cross border shelling into turkey on wednesday. the u.s. strongly supported the meeting of the nato council that reassured turkey that defense commitments from the other members of the alliance were still firm and includes the united states. the u.s. has all along supported and very closely ashrined with turkish policy with regard to the regime and the need for asad to go and end repression. the problem is, that neath are the turks or the united states have been able to, don't have any leverage on assadand no able
. michael, why don't you weigh in on this. you hear what jemma is saying. i've been surprised at how the market has brushed off europe. do worry it will come back into the forefront? >> absolutely. well done cnbc. no one covering europe and sorting it out better than jemma. we follow her closely. and i would break with a lot of that. and for us a lot of it here in the markets are strictly just pivot points. you mentioned 1.29. there's a lot of traders that wonder why we're still up at these levels or even coming off of a breach of 1.30 when the market sleclearly has a differe perception. particularly there are markets that we watch that show where the growth is going and right now crude oil is one of them because we're below 89 and holding it from a demand perspective and then there's a whole component of where is the worry and all of a sudden gold is getting ready to breach 1800. i think if you mix all of that together, you're starting to understand that the hurdle in the middle of the track right now being the payroll number is really going to be not necessarily a deciding factor,
and inexperience. >> reporter: in the next election, democratic candidate michael dukakis is asked this controversial question in his debate with vice president george bush. >> governor, if kitty dukakis were raped and murdered, would you favor an irrevocable death penalty for the killer? >> no, i don't, bernard, i think you know i oppose the death penalty during all of my life. >> reporter: the public sees his answer as cold and dispassionate. and that very night his poll numbers dropped. during the 1988 vice presidential debate, republican senator dan quayle's comparison of john f. kennedy elicits this blistering response from his opponent. >> senator, you're no jack kennedy. >> reporter: body language plays a part in the presidential debate in 1992, george h.w. bush deliberately looks at his watch and pays for it when the audience and voters see it as disrespectful. >> there are differences. >> reporter: body language makes a difference in a debate between al gore and george w. bush as well. gore sighs over and over again and bush surprises by winning the debate and the election
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)

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